Nutrition Policy

  • New Federal Nutrition Standards for Public Schools

     
    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) has established new and improved nutrition standards for school lunches as part of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act signed into law in 2010. These new standards mark the first major change to school meals in more than 15 years. Fort Bend ISD’s Child Nutrition Services Department has made changes to its menus and its preparation techniques to comply with the new standards.

    Fort Bend ISD implemented these changes in the 2012-2013 school year, a year ahead of when the regulations were mandated to go into effect. Child Nutrition will offer additional whole grain products and will increase the number of servings of fruits and vegetables.

    Other new components to FBISD’s meal program include:
    • Students must choose a minimum of ½ cup of a vegetable or fruit each day.
    • A wider variety of vegetables are now being offered.
    • All grains are now whole-grain, 51% or higher.
    • Milk options will be 1% or fat-free.
    • Juice (4%) will no longer be an option at lunch.
    • Calories, sodium and saturated fats are now required to be within a certain range in food items sold or served.

    Texas Administrative Code

     
    The United States Department of Agriculture and the Texas Department of Agriculture mandates the nutrient content of the food items served or sold to students during the school day. The Texas Department of Agriculture regulations are contained in the Texas Administrative Code.

    Elementary Schools:

     
    At the elementary school level, competitive (fundraising) foods and snacks are not allowed to be sold or served to students anywhere on school premises throughout the school day, until the end of the last scheduled class period. Campuses may have up to three pre-approved school days where competitive foods are allowed to be sold or served.
     

    Middle Schools:

     
    At the middle school level, competitive (fundraising) foods and snacks are not allowed to be sold or served to students anywhere on school premises from 30 minutes before to 30 minutes after meal periods. 
     

    High Schools:

     
    At the high school level, competitive (fundraising) foods and snacks may be sold or served at any time during the school day, including during the lunch period, provided they are not sold or made available in the area where cafeteria meals are being sold or consumed. For example, at a high school, the cafeteria and commons area would be off limits during the meal period. Organizations shall be allowed to sell at breakfast three days per week and lunch one day per week.

    OR

    Organizations shall be allowed to sell at breakfast one day per week and lunch three days per week.

    AND

    One outside vendor’s potentially hazardous food product shall be allowed to be sold one day per week. (Potentially hazardous products are defined as any food product containing meat, cheese, milk, eggs, or other dairy product, etc. such as Pizza, Chicken and Yogurt.) All nutritional information shall be in compliance with all regulations. Organizations may rotate products on a weekly basis.
    • DECA marketing class projects shall comply with new Federal nutrient standards, Texas Administrative Code and all local policies and procedures.
    • All food sale and service during the school day shall be in compliance with the Federal Nutrient Standards, Texas Administrative Code and the Texas Department of Health and all local policies and procedures.
    • Food sales or service outside the school day are not subject to these procedures or the Texas Administrative Code. However, these sales or service shall be in compliance with the Texas Department of Health Policies and procedures at all times. 
    New guidelines will be effective July 1, 2014, as a result of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act signed into law in 2010.
     

    The Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, Public Law 111-296

     
    There were no meal price increases for the current school year; however the Healthy, Hunger Free Kids Act of 2010, Public Law 111-296 does mandate meal pricing nationwide. For more information about this law, please visit the Food and Nutrition Service division of the United States Department of Agriculture.

    Three Steps for Healthy Kids

    1. Eat a balanced diet
    2. Exercise often
    3. Get plenty of rest