• The information below is to help Digital Media Academy students review the various UIL competitions that are valuable to students wanting a career in digital media. The purpose of digital media is to get the right message to the right person at the right time. The events below will help students develop their skills in targeting their message to the right audience at the right time. Students are strongly encourage to participate in UIL activities. Academy students who participate in one of the competitions below will be able to use the competition as an enrichment activity. In order for the student to use the competition as an enrichment activity the student MUST participate (and do his/her best) in the competition. Starting with the 2016-2017 school year only Digital Media Academy students who place at one of the UIL competitions in one of the areas listed below will be able to use the placement as an enrichment activity. 
     
    Please contact the HHS UIL Coordinator, Mr. Val Jimenez @ Valentin.Jimenez@fortbendisd.com, for additional information regarding specific coaches for each area.
     
    UIL for DMA Students:

    Computer Applications
    For the ‘tech’ generation: Become technologically savvy while testing your word processing, database and spreadsheet skills. You’ll become familiar with the finer points of computer skills such as formatting copy, editing, creating charts and integrating applications. Computer Applications focuses on word processing speed and accuracy, computer skills in database and spreadsheet, and integration of applications. Skills tested include formatting copy, mail merge, headers/footers, editing, proofreading, spreadsheet, graphs/charts, and integration of all applications.

    Computer Science
    Bill Gates used to program computers in his spare time, and apparently he did something right. Get your start in computer science by learning the details of Java programming, and try your hand at writing some programs of your own. The Computer Science Contest challenges high school students to gain an understanding of the significance of computation as well as the details of Java programming, to be alert to new technology and information, to gain an understanding of the basic principles of computer science and to get a start in one of the most important fields of the Information Age.

    Editorial Writing
    This contest gives you a chance to win a medal just for sharing your opinion. In editorial writing, you’ll take a stand on a controversial school issue and back up your stance with facts and examples.
    This contest teaches students to read critically, to digest and prioritize information quickly and to write clearly, accurately and succinctly. Emphasis is placed on mechanical and stylistic precision, lead writing, use of direct and indirect quotes, news judgment, and the ability to think deeply, to compare and contrast and to argue or defend a point of view persuasively.

    Feature Writing
    If you’ve got a knack for developing a story, this contest is for you. You’ll be provided with the facts and quotes you need, and then it’s up to you to piece together a journalistic feature story your readers will remember. The Feature Writing Contest teaches students to read critically, to digest and prioritize information quickly and to write clearly, accurately and succinctly. Emphasis is placed on the same writing skills as in other UIL journalism contests, as well as the ability to write descriptively.

    Headline Writing
    Put the finishing touches on the news as you decide what’s most important about six news stories and top them off with headlines. The challenge is to be creative in your word choice and adhere to the word and line counts as you write tomorrow’s headlines. The contest teaches students to read critically, to digest and prioritize information quickly and to write clearly, accurately and succinctly. Emphasis is placed on the ability to discern key facts and to write with flair and style in order to tell and sell a story.

    News Writing
    In this contest, you decide what’s fit to print as you make your way through a set of facts and quotes, and pick out what’s important. You’ll work on deadline for the newspaper as you create a cohesive story that inquiring minds have a right to know. The News Writing Contest teaches students to read critically, to digest and prioritize information quickly, and to write clearly, accurately and succinctly. Emphasis is placed on mechanical and stylistic precision, lead writing, use of direct and indirect quotes, and news judgment.

    Informative Speaking

    This contest is all about watching the clock and knowing your material. You’ll draw a current event and have 30 minutes to comb through files you’ve collected throughout the year. Then you’ll present a speech that informs your audience on all aspects of the current event you’ve researched. The purpose of informative speaking is to stimulate an active interest in current affairs at the state, national and international levels, and to teach the student to present extemporaneously in a clear and impartial manner the facts about a subject as they appear in the best available sources of information. This contest is an exercise in clear thinking and informing the public on the issues and concerns of the American people. The objective is to present information in an interesting way, and an attempt should not be made to change the listener’s mind beyond presenting the information.

    Persuasive Speaking
    Similar to informative speaking, in this contest you have 30 minutes to review your research files on a particular current event and come to a conclusion to argue about that topic. The goal of your speech is not just to present relevant information, but to convince your audience that your position is solid. This contest trains students to analyze a current issue, determine a point of view, and organize and deliver a speech that seeks to persuade listeners. The objective is to reinforce the views of listeners who already believe as the speaker does, but even more so, to bring those of neutral or opposing views around to the speaker’s beliefs or proposed course of action. This contest should especially appeal to those who have a strong argumentative urge and who wish to advocate reforms or outline solutions to current problems.